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Tiny Tim is 
considering 
a T ransplant. 


THE VOLETTE 


FORTY-SECOND YEAR MARTIN, TENN. , WEDNESDAY, OCT. I, 1969 


Raquel Welched. 

_ I 

VOLUME 2 


Four Seasons 
Give Concert 
Tuesday Night 

The Four Seasons, one of the 
most sought after groups on the 
campus circuit, will perform at 
the Fleldhouse Tuesday night at 

8 : 00 . 

SINCE THE quartet’s first 
million - seller in ’62 -- 
“Sherry” -- it has had some 
40 more precious metal singles. 
The New Jersey natives have 
sold more than 50 million discs. 

Unlike most of the guitar cult 
and the pastel costumes, the 
Seasons have worked the more 
sophisticated saloons and niter- 
ies. They have worked at the 
Coconut Grove in LA, New 
York’s Empire Room, and the 
Landmark in Las Vegas. 

SOME OF the biggest plat¬ 
ters by them have been, "Big 
Girls Don’t Cry,” "Walk Like 
A Man,” "Dawn,” “Let’s Hang 
On,” "I’ve Got You Under My 
Skin,” "Working My Way Back 
To You,” "Tell It To The Rain,” 
and "Will You Love Me To¬ 
morrow” and many others. 

Tickets are $3 in advance, 
$4 at the door. The Student 
Center Information Desk is 
selling tickets. 

Autos Must 
Be Registered 
Director Says 

Fewer than half of the ex¬ 
pected 3500 to 3600 automo¬ 
biles on campus have been re¬ 
gistered, according to Ed White 
Director of the Department of 
Safety and Security. 

"DURING the first two days 
of registration, we registered 
only 1500 vehicles,” Mr. White 
stated. "The deadline for re¬ 
gistration is Friday.” 

Failure to register vehicles 
after the deadline results in a 
$3 fine plus the registration 
fee. 

One concern of the safety 
director’s was the failure of 
many students to comply with 
parking zone regulations. "In 
driving around the parking 
lots,” Mr. White noted, "Ihave 
noticed that students aren’t pay¬ 
ing attention to the parking 
signs, especially around the 
library and university center 
lots.” Signs are displayed 
separating staff, commuters, 
and non-commuters lots. 

White cautioned students not 
to park in the lot behind the 
ROTC Building. The lot is 
for staff only. 

Convenient parking for Atr¬ 
ium residents is on the draw¬ 
ing boards, according to White. 
"We plan, maylie, toclearfrom 
the area at the corner of Moody 
and Lee Street, the old Church 
of Christ Activities Buildingand 
make a parking lot there, which 
is also next to the Home Ma¬ 
nagement Building.” 

Three new patrolmen have 
joined the Department of Safe¬ 
ty and Security. Carroll R. 
Blanton of South Fulton was 
formerly a member of a Flo¬ 
rida police department, and Ho¬ 
mer J. Chandler of Martin and 
John A. Harrison, formerly of 
Memphis are the officers ad¬ 
ded. 



THE REAL THING — Jazz lovers will get a 
treat when the Kid Thomas Preservation Hall 
Jazz Band comes to the fleldhouse Friday at 


8 pan. Tickets are on sale at tne univer 
slty Center Information desk for $1.50. 


M 


usic 


M 


ajor 


Pop Festivals Revisited To Compete 



Frosh Account 
For One-Third 
Of Enrollment 


An additional 445 students 
over last year brought UTM’s 
total enrollment to the antici¬ 
pated 4200 mark, a 15% over¬ 
all increase. 

APPROXIMATELY 1600 of 
this enrollment are freshmen, 
forming 37% of the entire stu¬ 
dent body. 

The largest number of en¬ 
rolling freshmen from one 
county numbers 296 students 
from Shelby County. From 
middle Tennessee, especially 
Davidson County, there was 
100% increase over last vear. 

DEAN OF Admissions Henry 
C. Allison stated that registra¬ 
tion was only “down in return¬ 
ing students, at least 100 below 
the projected number.” 


(Editor’s Note: A staff writer who must remain anonymous 
this time attended all six of the major music festivals this sum¬ 
mer. The following Is his reflection on some aspects ofthe 
pop trail...) 

Five pop festivals and jazz at Newport blasted the sounds of 
the times — maybe as much Platonlcally aphrodisiac as ampli¬ 
fied — to an audience of over one million people including me 
at all of them this summer. 

CONTRARY TO too much mass belief, the crowds werenot 
all young and hippie. The Establishment numbered ten percent 
in total attendance. Although the news media coverage was 
excellent, with the possible exception of Newsweek, the press 
failed to note that of the 300 or so arrested for drug violations, 
over half of them were over 30-years-old, the age that defines 
the Establishment population. . - 


Ironically, and even more so¬ 
cially disturbing, almost all the 
drug users were on hard stuff, 
opium derivatives, poppy 
people, the mainliners who have 
to use the syringe togettotheir 
veins. Television news man¬ 
aged to show the lack of 
violence, but the communal gre¬ 
gariousness of the "Now Gen¬ 
eration” which came on some 
screens was enough to titillate 
the tastes of viewers. 

Time Magazine, which gives 
more nudity with the news than 
any other medium, did focus 
on some of the topless girls 
who found some of the days too 
hot. It gave special attention 
to some of the nudes in At¬ 
lanta where the temperature 
kept ambulances shuttling those 
shorted out by the sun to in¬ 
firmaries. Some nudies were 
arrested at all the festivals, but 
not many. The police, in multi¬ 
tudes at all six musical fests, 
were very commendable in let¬ 
ting the music lovers, a few 
literally, do "their own thing.” 

In late June some friends and 
I left in a ’58 Ford for the 
Newport Jazz Festival. This 
gathering drew a more sedate, 
older crowd. The music was 
good, but nothing to compare 
with what came next. 

I hitchlked to Atlantic City. 
The festival there featured 
such groups as "Blood, Sweat, 
and Tears.” "Creedence 
Clearwater Revival,” "The 
Chicago Transit Authority,” 
and many others. 

Next stop was Atlanta. A 


’54 hearse was our transpor¬ 
tation. The festival was more 
than the transportation with 
some of the most knocked out 
(continued on page 3) 


With Pianists 

Rae Shannon, junior educa¬ 
tion major and student of Al¬ 
lison Nelson, artist-in-resi- 
dence, will be one of 25 pian¬ 
ists competing in the Third Van 
Cliburn International Quadren¬ 
nial Piano Competition being 
held in Fort Worth, Texas, 
September 29 - October 12. 

THE two-week long competi¬ 
tion is divided into three hear¬ 
ings. Twelve semi-finalists 
are selected from the first 
hearing and six are chosen from 
the second hearing. 

THE first prize winner will 
receive $10,000 in cash, and will 
perform in concert in Carnegie 
Hall. 


Candidates for spring and 
summer graduation number 
536, which is a great increase 
over previous years. The num¬ 
ber of transfer students and 
graduate students has also risen 
this fall. 

"REGISTRATION was satis¬ 
factory, despite this increase 
in enrollment, but it got off 
to a slow start,” according to 
Dean Allison. This delay was 
due to worker registration 
which put the registration pro¬ 
cess about an hour behind sche¬ 
dule. 

Dean Allison also said he was 
considering the possibility of 
moving the whole process of 
registration to the Humanities 
Building, possibly Spring quar¬ 
ter, thus putting everything un¬ 
der one roof. 

Class Elecfions Set 

Elections for Class officers 
and Homecoming Queen will be 
held on Oct. 14 and 16. 

The deadline for organiza¬ 
tions nominees is Tuesday. The 
only qualification is to be 
nominated by an official or¬ 
ganization on campus. 


FASHION WINNERS — Scarves, chains, snort 
skirts and wide leg pants catch the fashion eye 
again this year on campus. The coeds showing 


their fashion know-how are Vicki Brown, 
Linda Watson, Joy Robbins, Pat Brown, and 
Cathy Adams. 










Page 2 




The Volette, Martin, Tennessee. Wednesday, October I, 1969 


Campus Parking Poses 
Increasing Problems 

Approximately 4200 students arrived on campus in 3500 auto¬ 
mobiles. Tiiis is a great increase and causes some problems. 

NEW parking areas were completed this summer. Yet more 
space is still badly needed to adequately accomodate the influx 
of traffic. Inconvenience is the lightest word to express it. 

The campus police are doing their job when they issue tickets 
for parking in restricted zones. But often in desperation the 
frustrated student and faculty member parks in an illegal zone 
as a last resort. 

PLANS are on the drawing board to clear the area at the cor¬ 
ner of Moody and Lee Street for a parking lot where the old 
Church of Christ Activities Building is located. 

True, there is ample parking if new residence hall parking 
lots are included in the count. The only real parking pressures 
are centered around the academic buildings where space is in¬ 
adequate. 

PERHAPS it would be noteworthy to add that many campuses 
end such problems by forbidding freshman to bring cars. 

Since UTM pays for its parking lots out of appropriated 
funds, one must realize money is of the essence. At other UT 
campuses a student fee pays for the student parking areas. 

IF the university continues to grow at the rapid pace it has 
in the last two years, some action must be taken. 

What is the best solution? 

Another repercussion relating to the rise in thecountofjautos 
is tire blind spot at the corner of Hannings and Mt. Pelia Road. 
This intersection is located at the Main entrance to McCord and 
Ellington Halls. A red light would be appropriate there. 



Public Should Be Allowed 
To Censor Entertainment 


The freedom to read is essential to our democracy. It is 
under attack. Private groups and public authorities in various 
parts of the country are working to remove books from sale, 
to censor textbooks, to label “controversial” books, to distribute 
lists of “objectionable” books or authors, and to purge libraries. 

THESE actions apparently rise from a view that our national 
tradition of free expression is no longer valid; that censorship 
and suppression are needed to avoid the subversion of politics 
and the corruption of morals. 

We, as citizens devoted to the use of books and as librarians 
and publishers responsible for disseminatingthem, wish toassert 
the public interest in the preservation of the freedom to read. 

MOST attemps at suppression rest on a denial of the funda¬ 
mental premise of democracy: That the ordinary citizen, by 
exercising his critical judgment, will accept the good and 
the bad. The censors, public and private, assume that they 
should determine what is good and what is bad for their fellow- 
citizens. 


(PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE! 
AT MARTIN 

CO-EDITORS 

Dianne Craft Barbara Stockdale 

SPORTS EDITOR NEWS EDITOR 

Mike Nanney Bill Cate 

FEATURE EDITORS 

Patti Field Barry Eysman 



>The Volett 


Ht) 


BUSINESS EDITOR 

Crawford Gallimore 

FACULTY ADVISOR 

Carl H. Giles 


CARTOONIST 

Richard Hutcheons 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Noel Waller 


STAFF: 

JANEY PRITCHETT, SUSAN POPE, BONNIE MEADOR, 
MIKE BOEHLER, DAVID HILL, NELDA HOOD, CHUCK 
LARESE, NANCY SANDERS, MARILOU SCHWAM BRENDA 
FARROW.SHARON PRESSON, KATHY FLEET,KEMP WARD 
PEGGY McCORMICK,IRIS RIGGS,JUDY REASONS. ' 

The VOLETTE is represented In national advertising 
by the National Education Advertising Services. 

The VOLETTE invites letters to the editor: However, it 
reserves the right to edit and abridge all submissions. In 
order to be considered for publication, letters must be 
signed and should not exceed 300 words in length. 

Opinions expressed in the VOLETTE are not necessarily 
those of the editors, staff, or the University administration. 


Americans should be trusted to recognize propaganda, and to 
reject obscenity. They do not need the help of censors to assist 
them in this task. They are not prepared to sacrifice their 
heritage of a free press In order to be “protected” against 
what others think may be bad for them. Americans still favor 
free enterprise in ideas and expression. 

BOOKS are not alone In being subjected to efforts at suppres¬ 
sion. These efforts are related to a larger pattern of pressures 
being brought against education, the press, films, radio and tele¬ 
vision. The problem Is not only one of actual censorship. The 
shadow of fear cast by these pressures lads, we suspect, to 
an even larger voluntary curtailment of expression by those who 
seek to avoid controversy. 

Suppression is never more dangerous than in such a time of 
social tension. Freedom has given the United States the elas¬ 
ticity to endure strain. Freedom keeps open the path of novel 
and creative solutions, and enables change to come by choice. 
Every silencing of a heresy, every enforcement of an ortho¬ 
doxy, diminishes the toughness and resilience of our society 
and leaves it the less able to deal with stress. 

NOW as always in our history, books are among our greatest 
instruments of freedom. They are almost the only means for 
making generally available Ideas or manners of expression that 
can initially command only a small audience. They are the na¬ 
tural medium for the new Idea and the untried voice from which 
come the original contributions to social growth. They are es¬ 
sential to the extended discussion which serious thought requires, 
and to the accumulation of knowledge and ideas Into organized 
collections. 

Free communication is essential to the preservation of a free 
society and a creative culture. These pressures towards con¬ 
formity present the danger of limiting the range and variety 
of inquiry and expression on which our democracy and our 
culture depend. Every American community must jealously 
guard the freedom to read. 

PUBLISHERS and llbrai-lans have a profound responsibility 
to give validity to that freedom to read by making it possible 
for the readers to choose freely from a variety of offerings. 

The freedom to read is guaranteed by the Constitution. 
Those with faith In free men will stand firm on these constitu¬ 
tional guarantees of essential rights and will exercise the re¬ 
sponsibilities that accompany these rights. 


|Parade Of Opinionjj 


Dear Editor: 

I would like to commend the 
student government on bring¬ 
ing the Town Criers to our 
campus for the first concert 
of the ’69-70 school year. This 
group was really great! The 
only regrets I have about the 
concert was that the Fleldhouse 
was not filled to capacity. 

WITH groups like this one, 
all students should take advan¬ 
tage and attend these concerts. 
It Is a shame that someone could 
even think that a new group to 
our great campus could be poor. 

I hope that every other con¬ 
cert this year can equal the 
Town Crier. They showed such 
versability when they played 
“The Impossible Dream”along 
with many other songs. 

TRULY I am proud of our 


student government and its 
leaders. 

David Young 


Dear Editors: 

In helping our athletic teams 
to win, no factor Is more im¬ 
portant than the Volunteer Spi¬ 
rit. Even though we did not 
win our contest with McNeese, 
the spirit demonstrated by the 
students who gathered at the 
goalpost prior to the game help¬ 
ed to give the football team a 
mental lift. 

ON behalf of the football team, 
I wish to express our appre¬ 
ciation for this support and I 
hope that In the future addition¬ 
al people will participate In this 
form of support. 

Coach Robert Carroll 


Critic ’• Comer 


by Kathy Flaat 

According to the 1969 Student 
Handbook, “One of the basic 
assumptions of the University 
is that each student has and 
will exercise the capability for 
making Judgments about his be¬ 
havior.” However basic this 
faith In each student’s Judgment 
Is, the handbook lays down a few 
laws, 19 to be exact. 

IN order to "provide guide¬ 
lines” which will help the stu¬ 
dent In his “after-collegeexis¬ 
tence,” the University provides 
disciplinary action for the stu¬ 
dent who finds himself among 
one of the 19 categories. 

The conscientious student 
need have no fear that 19 con¬ 
duct rules are not enough to 
regulate the evil which lurks 
In the hearts of many students. 
Thanks to ambiguous wording 
and the frequent use of “but,” 
“except” and “however" 
clauses, several rules can be 
Interpreted to make almost any¬ 
thing Illegal. 

AS ONE student remarked, 
the rule concerning the gather¬ 
ing of groups of students on 
campus could make It Illegal to 
shake hands with a friend If this 
seems to “Interfere with the 
orderly functioning of the Uni¬ 
versity." Whatever, that Is. 

It Is also Interesting to com¬ 
pare the rule concerning nar¬ 
cotics, drugs, and alcoholic 
beverages. The “use, posses¬ 
sion, distribution or being un¬ 
der the influence of narcotics 
or drugs” Is prohibited while 
only the “possession or use of 
alcoholic beverages” Is Illegal. 
It seems that one may stagger 
around the campus all the likes, 
but never may he float. 


SG Dateline 



Student Government would 
like to encourage each student 
to participate In the many and 
varied activities we sponsor 
during the school year. 

THIS Friday at 8:00 p.m. the 
Preservation Hall Jazz Band 
will perform in concert. They 
have a tremendous act, and 
everyone is invited to come and 
enjoy the show. Students may 
buy their tickets for $1.00 at 
the Information desk. 

The "Four Seasons” will 
be at the Fleldhouse October 
7 at 8:00 p.m. This concert 
promises to be a very en¬ 
joyable one. 

THE first House of Rep¬ 
resentatives meeting will be 
Monday, October 6. 

We encourage each organiza¬ 
tion to send a representative. 
This Is the recognized channel 
of communication to the ad¬ 
ministration, and students are 
urged to air their grievances 
and opinions about the univer¬ 
sity. 

SOCIAL dates for fall quart¬ 
er will be drawn Wednesday 
night at 7;30 p.m. In the con¬ 
ference rooms of the Univer¬ 
sity Center. 

On Thursday the Screening 
Committee of the UT Trustees 
will be on campus. This com¬ 
mittee is made up of eight 
trustees who are seeking sug¬ 
gestions and recommendations 
relative to a successor for the 
retiring UT President, Dr. Andy 
Holt. 

WE hope every student will 
be thinking about character¬ 
istics and qualifications need¬ 
ed for this job and voice their 
opinions by contacting the SG 
Senators. 

Thank you, 

Billy Cunningham 

SG President 





The Volette, Martin, Tennetsee, Wednesday, October I, 1969 


us Calendar 


Liberal Arts Club—Meetings will be held the last Tuesday 
of each month. Officers were elected at last night’s meet¬ 
ing. 

Home Economics—The first meeting will be held Monday night 
at 6 p.m. at the Home Economics playground for a weenie 
roast. 


SNEA —The first meeting will be held Monday at 7 p.m. In 
the student center. The guest speaker will be Mrs. Charlene 
Collier. 

Photography Club—A meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. In the 
Drama Building. Interested students and faculty are Invited 
to attend. 


duct, of the rock congregations. a relaxant, could De obtained. 
A week later, I raised my thumb There was very little use of 
for New Orleans, where fortun- hard drugs though, 
ately for my sagging spine I There were some morally 
had friends with good mattress- questionable Incidents. But the 
es. homosexuals remained apart 

I found the experience pro- from the others at all of the 
ductive. People from all walks, festivals. Except for a few 
paved and dirt, of life, all races, scattered scenes of secual un- 
and all manner of interests Inhlbitedness and lewdness, 
could live together in a com- raost relations were discreet, 
munity atmosphere of peace, Unfortunately, litter and 
eood-will and neighborly help- ‘rash was everywhere. AtNew- 
fulness. port most of the debris con- 

_ ' slsted of liquor bottles and 

Grass was the most plentiful ^ ^ At Atlantoj New 

PlUs were also h. grea 0rleans ’ DaUas ’ and AUanUc 

Pius were also in great oe cl ^ trash from pro _ 

man *\ ‘ i"n y nm K ^rvnn ^ams to unusedpapers to roll 
widows, pep pills, to Darvon, j 0 j nts 


There 


AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE - UTM 
looks like a used car lot these days as al- 

Pop Festivals 
Revisited 

t 

(continued from page 1) 
rock ever produced. 

The second week In August 
I set out for what I thought 
was another obscure festival, 

White Plains. The Woodstock 
billing came from the beauti¬ 
ful wood bracketing that up¬ 
state New York area. Over 
a half million people concen¬ 
trated In a six acre lot. 

Roads surrounding the lyri¬ 
cal locale were reminiscent of 
military convoys having prob¬ 
lems In old war movies. 

I hitchiked out of Knoxville 
where I caught a ride with a 
Miami crew destined for the 
festival. 

Dallas and New Orleans were 
the last two. I bussed to Dal¬ 
las and bivouacked with friends. 

The great disaster was at 
Woodstock. Trash, trash, 
trash. Susan Spotless would 
have thrown up, and humanity 
should be sick of It. The “pigs- 


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to Poster Mart, P. O. Bo* 165. 
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check or money order ('oC O D.'i) In 
the amount of $2.00 for each blow up. 

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material returned undamaged. Satisfac¬ 
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The Volette, Martin, Tennessee, Wednesday, October I, 1969 


Page 4 


William Shank 


James C. Owens 


Patrick R. Taylor 


Janies Robert Andreas 


Marvin L. Downing 


Col. Harold .1. Mever 


wiiiiam A. d uiou 


David Hinton 


Anne L. COOK 


R. L. KittUson 


Martha wrntt 


Lucille B. Grasfeder 


Harry Houll 


or. carl R. Wasmuth 


M. M. Ansari 


Ernest W. Blvthe. Jr. 


Gerald E. McElvaln 


Maria Malone 


James E. Toomey 


Gayle Wuik 


Thirty - nine new faculty 
members have been employed 
for the academic school year 
1969-70. 

JAMES ROBERT ANDREAS 
has been appointed assistant 
professor of English. He re¬ 
ceived his bachelor of arts de¬ 
gree from Northwestern Uni¬ 
versity in 1965 and his master 
of arts degree at John Hopkins 
in 1966. 

MOHAMMED M. ANSARI, as¬ 
sistant professor of engineer¬ 
ing, earned his two bachelor 
of science degrees from Mid¬ 
dle East Technological Univer¬ 
sity, Ankara, Turkey and from 
Osmania University, Hydera¬ 
bad, India in 1961 and 1954, 
respectively. He received his 
master of science degree from 
the University of Houston in 
1963. Mr. Ansari is a native 
of Hyderabad. 

BETSY L. BERRY, an as¬ 
sistant professor of zoology, 
received her bachelor of 
science and master of science 
degrees from the University of 
Arkansas in 1954 and 1958. 

ERNEST W. BLYTHE, JR. 
will be an assistant professor 
of geology. He earned his bach¬ 
elor of science degree at Ten¬ 
nessee Polytechnic Institute in 
1954 and his master of science 
degree at the University of Ten¬ 
nessee in 1967. 

DENNIS L. BREEDEN has 
been employed as an assistant 
professor of economics. He 
received his bachelor of arts 
degree at Lamar State Col¬ 
lege of Technology in 1964 and 
his master of arts and master 
of business administration de¬ 
grees in 1968 and 1967 from 
the University of Houston. 

GILBERT M. CARP, as- 
socite professor of music, re¬ 
ceived his bachelor of music 
and master of music degrees 
at Converse College in 1949 
and 1952. He received a bache¬ 
lor of music education degree 
at Louisiana State in 1947. Mr. 
Carp has 40 hours on his doc¬ 
tor of music degree at Florida 
State. 

RICHARD D. CHESTEEN, In¬ 
structor, in political science, 
received his bachelor of arts 


degree at Delta State College 
in 1962 and his master of arts 
degree at the University of 
Mississippi in 1963. He is 
working toward a doctor of 
philosophy degree at the Uni¬ 
versity of Mississippi. 

ANNE L. COOK joins the 
home economics department as 
an instructor in food science 
and nutrition. She received her 
bachelor of science and master 
of science degrees at the Uni¬ 
versity of Tennessee in 1960 
and 1963, respectively. 

NORVELL a COOK, in¬ 
structor in sociology, received 
his bachelor of arts and mast¬ 
er of arts degrees in 1959 and 
1964 from the University of 
Tennessee. 

DAVID H. COOPER, instruct¬ 
or in psychology, received his 
bachelor of arts degree at West¬ 
ern Kentucky University in 1956 
and his master of arts degree 
at Murray State University in 
1964. 

WILLIAM A. DILLON, an as¬ 
sistant professor of biological 
sciences, earned his bachelor 
of science degree in 1960 at 
Texas Christian University, his 
master of arts degree at the 
College of William and Mary 
in 1963, and his doctor of philo¬ 
sophy degree at the University 
of Southern Mississippi in 1969. 

MARVIN L. DOWNING has 

KELLY'S 

AMERICAN 

HAS 

Amoco's 

FAMOUS 

WHITE GAS 


201 MAIN ST. 
MARTIN, TENN. 


been appointed assistant pro¬ 
fessor of history. He received 
his bachelor of arts degree at 
Way land Baptist College In 1959 
and his master of arts degree 
at Texas Christian University 
in 1963. 

JOHN L. FLETCHER, an as¬ 
sistant professor of finance, 
earned his bachelor of science 
degree at Hendrix College in 
1948 and his master of science 
degree at the University of 
Tennessee in 1967. 

LUCILLE B. GRASFEDER 
returns to the UTM campus as 
an instructor in physical ed¬ 
ucation. She received her 
bachelor of science degree at 
the University of Tennessee 
at Martin in 1964. 

ROY N. GRAVES H, an as¬ 
sistant professor of English, 
received his bachelor of arts 
degree at Princeton University 
in 1961 and his master of arts 
degree from Duke University 
in 1965. He has completed 
course work for his doctor 
of philosophy degree at Duke 
University. 

DAVID W. HINTON will be 
an assistant professor of 
economics. He received his 
bachelor of science degree at 
Upper Iowa University in 1965 
and his master of business ad¬ 
ministration at the University 
of Arkansas in 1967. Mr. Hin¬ 


ton is working on his doctor 
of philosophy degree at the 
University of Arkansas. 

HARRY P. HOUFF, assist¬ 
ant professor of physics, re¬ 
ceived his bachelor of science 
degree at the Case Institute 
of Technology in 1962 and ex¬ 
pects his doctor of philosophy 
degree at Case Western Re¬ 
serve this year. 

HARRY M. HUTSON will be 
a professor in and the chair¬ 
man of the history and poli¬ 
tical science department. He 
received his bachelor of arts 
degree at the University of 
Maryland in 1942 and his mast¬ 
er of arts degree at the Uni¬ 
versity of Iowa in 1948. Mr. 
Hutson received his doctor of 
philosophy degree in 1952 from 
the University of Iowa. 

BARBARA A. JONES, an in¬ 
structor In music, received her 
bachelor of arts degree in 1963 
from Meredith College and her 
master of music degree in 1966 
from the New England Conser¬ 
vatory of Music. 

KARL E. KEEFER has been 
appointed professor and dean 
of the School of Education. He 
received his bachelor of arts 
and master of arts degree from 
Bob Jones College in 1942 and 
1945, respectively. He re¬ 
ceived his master of educa¬ 
tion degree from the Univer¬ 


sity of Chattanooga in 1960 and 
his doctor of education degree 
from the University of Tennes¬ 
see in 1965. 

HAROLD L. KITTILSON joins 
the biological sciences staff as 
an assistant professor. He re¬ 
ceived his bachelor of arts de¬ 
gree in 1956 from Luther Col¬ 
lege, his master of science de¬ 
gree in 1961 from Mankato State 
CoUege, and his doctor of philo¬ 
sophy degree from North Caro¬ 
lina State University in 1967. 

BRENDA J. LAYMAN has 
been appointed assistant pro¬ 
fessor of home economics ed¬ 
ucation. She received her 
bachelor of science and her 
master of science degrees from 
the University of Tennessee in 
1963 and 1967. 

GERALD E. McELVAIN, an 
instructor in psychology, re¬ 
ceived his bachelor of arts 
degree from Greenville Col¬ 
lege in 1953, his bachelor of 
divinity degree from Asbury 
Theological Seminary in 1958, 
and his master of arts degree 
from the University of Texas 
in 1969. 

MARIA MALONE has been 
employed as an assistant pro¬ 
fessor of French. She re¬ 
ceived her bachelor of arts 
degree from Faculdadede Fllo- 
sofla da Universidade de Mlnae 
in 1948 and her master of arts 


FOR ALL YOUR 

GIFT AND JEWELRY 

NEEDS VISIT 

JEWELRY 

martin, tojnessee 

CO«NI* OF LINOSLL * OXFORD 













The Volette, Martin, Tennessee, Wednesday, October I, 1969 


Page 5 



Phillip J. Miller Brenda J. Layman Richard D. Chesteen Rerhara Jones David Cooper Vernon Prather 



Donald Wells Dennis Breeden Gilbert Carp Norvel H. Cook Allison Nelson Richard Slocum 


39 Faculty 
lembers Added 




Betsy L. Berry 



Dr. Karl Keeler 


degree from Faculdade de 
Fllosofia da Unlversldade de 
Minas Gerais In 1949. She Is 
a native of Brazil. 

PHILLIP J. MILLER has been 
appointed assistant professor of 
English. He received his bach¬ 
elor of arts degree from In¬ 
diana University In 1962 and his 
master of arts degree from 
Idaho State University In 1964. 

COL. H.J. MEYER entered 
staff Is Colonel Harold J. 
Meyer. Colonel Meyer entered 
the army In 1943 and has serv¬ 
ed In the European Command, 
the U. S. Army Pacific and In 
Vietnam. 

HE received a BA degree in 
Biology from Kent State Uni¬ 
versity and a MA degree In 
Journalism from the University 
of Missouri. 

ALLISON NELSON has been 
appointed as a part-time In¬ 
structor in music and as an 
artist-in-resldence. She has 
a diploma from the Curtis In¬ 
stitute and an honorary doctor 
of music degree from Alliance 
College. 

JAMES C. OWENS, assistant 
professor of education, re¬ 
ceived his bachelor of science 
degree from Lane College in 
1956, his master of science de¬ 
gree from Tennessee A & I In 
1959, and his Ed.S degree from 
the University of Tennessee In 


1967. 

VERNON PRATHER, an In¬ 
structor In physical education, 
received his bachelor of science 
degree from the University of 
Tennessee at Martin In 1963. 

WILLIAM A. SHANK has been 
employed as an Instructor In 
music. He earned the bache¬ 
lor of music degree from the 
Syracuse School of Music In 
1963 and the master of music 
degree from Eastman School 
of Music, University of Roch¬ 
ester In 1965. 

RICHARD A. SLOCUM will 
be an assistant professor of 
mathematics. He received his 
bachelor of science degree from 
the University of Rochester In 
1958 and his master of science 
degree from Tulane In 1965. 
Mr. Slocum received his doc- 
of English. He earned his bach- 
tor of philosophy degree from 
Tulane in 1969. 

PATRICK R. TAYLOR, as¬ 
sistant professor of history, 
received his bachelor of arts 
degree from the University of 
Maryland In 1963, his master 
of arts from Memphis State 
University in 1964 and his doc¬ 
tor of philosophy from the 
University of Tennessee In 1969. 

JAMES E. TOOMEY has been 
appointed assistant professor 
of education. He received his 
bachelor of science degree. 




Shop The 

BI6 STAR 


"Where prices are right 
and clerks are polite.” 

Phone 587-8282 Martin 


master of arts degree, and doc¬ 
tor of education degree from 
the University of Southern Mis¬ 
sissippi in 1952, 1954, and 1965, 
respectively. 

DONALD G. WELLS, assist¬ 
ant professor of psychology, 
received his bachelor of arts 
and master of arts degrees in 
1963 and 1965 from the Uni¬ 
versity of Omaha. He re¬ 
ceived his doctor of philosophy 
degree this year from the Uni¬ 
versity of Texas. 

MARTHA A. WHITT joins the 
English department as an as¬ 
sistant professor. She received 
her bachelor of science and 
master of science degree in 
1959 and 1961 from Jacksonville 
State. 

LAUREN FRANK WINDHAM 
will be an associate professor 
elor of arts and master of arts 
degrees from Mississippi Col¬ 
lege In 1955 and 1960. He re¬ 
ceived his doctor of philosophy 
degree from the University of 
Missouri at Rolla In 1965. 

HELEN B. WINSOR joins the 
home economics department as 


an assistant professor. She re¬ 
ceived her bachelor of science 
degree In 1948 from State Col¬ 
lege of Arkansas. 

NANCY G. WULK has been 
employed as an instructor In 
physical education. She re¬ 
ceived her bachelor of science 
degree from the University of 
Tennessee In 1965 and her mas¬ 
ter of science degree from West 
Virginia in 1966. 

* * • * 

Each man must earn his own 
dignity. 


Writing Lab 
Organized 

THE English Laboratory wlU 
be held # in the Humanities 217, 
under Mr. Wayne Keene’s 
direction, at the following 
hours: Tuesday and Thursday 
afternoons from five to seven 
o’clock, Wednesday evening 
from seven to nine o'clock. 


BUY A COUPON BOOKLET 

KNOX HARDWARE 

COUPON WILL BE 
REDEEMED AT 

CITY HARDWARE 

FORMERLY KNOX HARDWARE 


WHAT'S YOUR SIGN} 


CAPRICORN 

AQUARIUS 

PISCES 

ARIES 


TAURUS 

GEMINI 

CANCER 

LEO 


VIRGO 

LIBRA 

SCORPIO 

SAGITTARIUS 


FOOD FOR EVERY BODY 


AT THE 


IVY HOUSE 

SOUL FOOD - BODY FOOD - AESTHETIC FOOD 

YOU NAME IT 







Page 6 


The Volette, Martin, Tennessee, Wednesday, October I, 1969 


Greeks 
On Campus 

ADPi 

Alpha Delta Pi pledged 25 
girls during fall rush. Hie 
new pledges are: Susan An¬ 
derson, Nancy Austin, Danlce 
Baker, Gall Davis, Cindy Gar¬ 
ner, Barbara Hurley, Beth Lane 
and Linda Laster, Memphis; 
Sylvia Alexander, Kay Collins, 
Ann Joyner, Harriet Maline, 
Nashville; Camille Carrington 
and Suzanne Farley, Collier¬ 
ville. 

Also pledging are: Donna 
Cody, Paris; Paula Goodman, 
Karen Moss, and Judy Peari- 
gen. Union City; Evelyn Dick, 
Paducah; Dee Fields, South 
Fulton; Lyla Kee, Dyersburg; 
Jane Mengel, Jefferson Coun¬ 
ty: Kathy Rogers, New Jersey; 
Kathy Walker, Tullahoma; and 
Becky Watlington, Jackson. 

AGR 

At the flrkt meeting last 
Thursday night the following 
Brothers were initiated: Tom¬ 
my Cannon, sophomore from 
Fulton; Danny Jones, sopho¬ 
more from Dresden; Paul Par¬ 
ker, sophomore from Coving¬ 
ton; Rod Pattat, sophomore 
from Mason; Bobby Sinclair, 
sophomore from Lutts; and Carl 
Watson, sophomore from Boli¬ 
var. 

AOPi 

Tau Omicron chapter of Al¬ 
pha Omicron Pi initiated nine 
new members on Wednesday, 
Sept. 17. They are Teresa An¬ 
derson, Marilyn Bennett, Donna 
Ford, Diana Koppeis, Patsy Mc- 
Fall, Elaine Mitchell, Barbara 
Stockdale, Barbara Whitaker, 
and DeeDee Weitzel. 

NEW OFFICERS Include; Sa¬ 
rah Coleman, president; Susie 
Smith, vice-president and 
pledge trainer; Donna Ford, so¬ 
cial chairman; Barbara Stock- 
dale, housekeeper; Elaine Mit¬ 
chell, scholarship; and Patsy 
McFall, Mothers’ Club chair¬ 
man. 

AOn has 24 new pledges. 
They are Becky Bale, Mem¬ 
phis; Brenda Barker, Fulton; 
Vickie Belcher Memphis; Diane 
Cartwright, Nashville; Carol 
Gaffney, Jackson^ Melissa Ham, 
Memphis; Jane Harris, Mem¬ 
phis; Jo Hill, Webster Groves, 
Missouri; Betty Hopper, Jack- 
son; Camille Jimmerson, Jack- 
son. 

Also pledging are Lynn Jones, 
Munford; Renee Ladd, Mem¬ 
phis; Rose Leeke, Memphis; 
Beverly Palmer, Nashville; 
Peggy Ryder, Memphis; Diana 
Smith, Grand Junction; Nancy 
Stalnaker, Memphis; Gayle 
Taylor, Dyersburg; Betty Jean 
Thompson, Brownsville; Peggy 
Tyree, Nashville; Jill Walker; 
Jackson; Kathy Wilkinson, 
Memphis; Patti Wilson, Jack- 
son; and Debbie Wright, Mem¬ 
phis. 


Phi Sig 

Phi Sig*s reported a week 
early this quarter and devoted 
much of their time to house 
cleaning and yard improvement. 

At the end of the week the! 
brothers dressed up like In-i 
dians and helped “psyche” the 
Vols as they battled the Mc- 
Neese Cowboys. 

On August 16 the summer so¬ 
cial was held in Memphis on 
the Memphis Queen. Phi Slg^ 
from the Memphis State Chapter 
also attended. Music was fur¬ 
nished by the Peppermint Fox. 


Pianist Presents Recital 



Miss Joyce L. Crane will 
present a piano recital Mon¬ 
day night at 8;00 in the Music 
Building Auditorium. This 
event is being sponsored by the 


Department of Music Education 
and the public is invited. 

MISS Crane teaches piano 
heri and is accompanist for 
the Opera Workshop. 


A—Tie-On, Button-Down, JUmp-ln 
That’s The Big JUmper Story This 
Fall. Dacron Polyester-Wool Knit 
In Ginger, Na Vy , Red ... Each With 
Co-Ordinated Blouse And Tie. 

Sizes 5 to 15. $38.00 

TOWN & CAMPUS 

GIFTS lot EVER* OCCASION 

from 

ORANGE BLOSSOM * ART CARVED 
ANSON * SPEIDEL 

WYLER * GORHAM 

INTERNATIONAL SILVER 
POPPYTRAIL * SYRACUSE 

NOR IT A KE ZIPPO 

RONSON , CROSS PEN 

VAN DELL * RICO LEATHER 

HAEGER POTTERY 

SEE THEM AT 

Umu'i 

1 JEWELRY 



W4SAI£ 


QNi aiwc<hon 


KINDNESS “2t". Lot* of Jaabc 
for bli curio. 24-roller hoiruner 
to Court, see-tbrouSb coco. 

All rollon worn op ot —to. 


MMINOTON 300 


new 

INSTANT 

SHAMPOO 


Jjy N ORELCO 
Triple 
Hoodor 

RAZOR 
Reg. $34.95 


J lLlI l] Reg. $1.8*51 29 

20% OFF 

SALE THRU SAT., OCT. 4 

Having Trouble Getting Up For Those Classes? 

Come Down And Pick Up One Of Our 
WESTCLOCK ELECTRIC MINIKIN CLOCKS 


MEN! 

WE HAVE JUST INSTALLED A NEW ROTATING 
PIPE RACK WITH ALL OF THE FAVORITES 
ON IT. COME DOWN AND CHECK THEM OUT 


C & R PHARMACY 








Page 7 



The Volette, Martin, Tennessee, Wednesday, October I, 1969 


Cadet Brigade 
Elects Sponsors 

The ROTC Cadet Brigade will 
elect new sponsors for the 1969- 
70 School Year during a for¬ 
mation In the Field House at 
1:30 p.m. tomorrow. 


Choir Times Set 


ALL CHOIRS meet In the Mu¬ 
sic Building Auditorium. TTie 
Choralairs meet Monday thru 
Friday from 3:00 to 4:00. The 
Co-eds meet Tuesday and 
Thursday from 2;00to3;00. The 
Madrigals Monday and Tuesday 
from 4;00 to 5-00. 

Choralairs auditions are now 
being held In Room 29 In the 
Music Building. 


The Vols tailed to contain Makl plunged from the one yard 
McNeese State’s ground at- line In the second period. Both 
tack and bowed to the Cowboys conversion attempts failed. 
17-15 In Saturday nights game. McNEESE narrowed the 12-0 
QUARTERBACK Glenn Lowe deficit when Ricky Miller 
completed nine of 12 passes for scored from the six and Mar- 
79 yards and one touchdown, vln LaGrappe booted the PAT. 
Leading the ground attack was The Vols came back Into tne 
freshman back Nate Moore who game with Robert Hassel’s 27 
carried 24 times for 164 yards, yard field goal In the third 
The Vols scored In the first quarter, but the offense could 
period on a 36 yard pass to not score. LaGrappe booted the 
snllt end Barry Reeves. Duff game winning 17-yard field goal 


FOUR CHOIRS are open to 
students. The Choralairs Is 
a mixed choir which performs 
sacred and secular music. The 
Co-eds, Is composed of Uni¬ 
versity co-eds and sings cur¬ 
rent pop music. 

The Madrigals are audition¬ 
ed from the Choralairs. The 
ROTC Chorus, a new choral 
group will sing pop, show and 
folk music. 


for McNeese State In the fourth 
period. 

OUR record stands at one win 
and two losses as the Vols have 
a week off to prepare fora road 
game at Jacksonville State on 
October 1L 


FRESHMAN 


THERE IS NO NEED TO 
WONDER WHERE YOU CAN 
BUY FASHIONABLE 
CLOTHES JUST ASK AN 
UPPERCLASSMAN, AND 
HE WILL TELL 
YOU ^HERE THE 
“IN CROWD” SHOPS 


BACK-TO-SCHOOL 

SPECIAL! 

AQUA NET <3oz. 79c 

ARRID EXTRA DRY 98( 

CANNON STRETCH HOSE 99( 
LISTERINE 30 02 . $ 1.39 

CLAIROL SHAMPOO 98 ( 

C0TY EMERAUDE 

COLOGNE 3.5 oz. $4.29 

BRUT $4.98 

HAI KARATE 402. $1.29 

McAdoo's Pharmacy 

BILL & ELSIE 


Live a Little! 


W How? Cash-value life insurance lets you do 
l your own thing. Ready cash when you need it. 
I Protection when you need it. Special policies 
" for seniors and graduate students. We'll take 
the risk. You have the fun. Live a Little! Our 
College Representative can show you how. 


Bob Archie 


r^nde ’Power 


THE BECeUE 

high, wide n handsoi 


Toe slightly widened, vamp climbing high¬ 
er, heel somewhat chunky ... it’s the city- 
pant shoe, the sassy rogue, the mini-boot, 
all for being where the action is, all timed 
for now. All for you. 


Puts Your Complexion Back in Action 


onderful 


Sum. wa want you to pampar and craam your laca. but avary onca In a whlla (at laaat 
avary othar day. In tact) your laca ahould aaa morn action Tha kind found In tlngla- 
powamd Miracol. It pata akin going and glowing, claan and claar. You can taaf It work. 

Miracol Tha tlngla-powarad Sacond Step In Marla Norman Coamattca Thran Stapa to 
Baauty complaxion cam plan 5V4 or bottle of Miracol. with applicator bruah and 
dtah *5 00 

Sold aiclualvaly at Marla Norman Coamatlc Studio, 

mERLE nORfTlfln oostttetics 


MARTIN, TENN 


587-2319 


MARTIN 


TENN. 








The Volette, Martin, Tennessee, Wednesday, October I, 1969 


Page 8 


OPENING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1 

THE BOOK RACK 

THOUSANDS OF PAPERBACK BOOKS 

TRADE 2 FOR 1 

“Come In And Browse” 

10c 29c 39c 50c 75c 

ACROSS FROM CITY HALL 

201 W. CHURCH ST. UNION CITY, TENN. 

PH. 885-4661 


Band Needs Members 

Several positions are open In Music Building, phone 587-3121, 
the University Marching Band. ext. 276. 

For further information con- * * * * 

tact Mr. Robert C. Fleming, , Wear y°“ r kce with joy. ft’s 
Director of Bands, Room 22, the only one you have. 

f GUNMAN'S DEPT. I 
STORE 

HEADQUARTERS 
FOR YOUR 
FALL WARDROBE 


WELCOME STUDENTS 

FREE 

CAR WASH 

FOR EVERY REGISTERED STUDENT CAR) 

THURS., 12-5 P.M. 

OCTOBER 2-9-16-24 

Wishy Washy Car Wash 


COPELAND 

CLEANERS 

401 JACKSON 

Drive In Window 
Service 

"Look Daisy Fresh” 




CIL'S 



RATON HWV 

IA ARTIN. mm 


LOW PRICES EVERY 


LBERTY*E 


^eocl S 



Decorate 
uMlls with 

’PoSTESLS 

5»«MS BPTrte ZooilVL 

STARS 

OTHERS 

At the 

Colony Shop 

Union! Crry 


I! TOUR HIND GROW 

WITH A CORRESPONDENCE COURSE 

WITH UTM CREDIT 

IT'S EASY 

WHEN YOU SET YOUR OWN PACE 


WRITE TO: 


UNIVERSITY CORRESPONDENCE STUDY 
DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE 
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 37916